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IMFINZI® (durvalumab) plus chemotherapy approved in the US for mismatch repair deficient advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

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AstraZeneca’s IMFINZI® (durvalumab), in combination with chemotherapy, has received FDA approval for treating mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. This approval is based on the DUO-E Phase III trial, showing a 58% reduction in disease progression or death compared to chemotherapy alone. The trial results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Endometrial cancer is notably prevalent, with over 66,000 diagnoses and nearly 12,000 deaths in the US in 2022. Early-stage diagnosis boasts an 80-90% five-year survival rate, but advanced stages drop below 20%. The combination treatment is seen as a significant advancement in a field that has seen progress. The safety profile of IMFINZI combined with chemotherapy is considered manageable and consistent with previous trials. Further regulatory reviews are ongoing in the EU, Japan, and other countries.

Positive
  • FDA approval for IMFINZI® in combination with chemotherapy for dMMR advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.
  • DUO-E trial shows a 58% reduction in disease progression or death compared to chemotherapy alone.
  • Results published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, enhancing credibility and visibility.
  • Over 66,000 endometrial cancer diagnoses and nearly 12,000 deaths in 2022 highlight the treatment’s relevance.
  • Considered a significant advancement in a field with progress in recent decades.
  • Safety profile of IMFINZI with chemotherapy is manageable and consistent with past trials.
  • Further regulatory reviews ongoing in EU, Japan, and other countries could expand market reach.
Negative
  • Advanced endometrial cancer has a five-year survival rate of less than 20%.
  • Potential severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions associated with IMFINZI.
  • 11% of patients discontinued IMFINZI due to adverse reactions in the DUO-E study.
  • 30% of patients experienced serious adverse reactions in the DUO-E study.
  • The DUO-E trial is still assessing overall survival as a key secondary endpoint, indicating incomplete data.

The approval of IMFINZI® (durvalumab) combined with chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer is a significant development for patients with mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) disease. This combination, followed by IMFINZI monotherapy, showed a 58% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death, as highlighted by the DUO-E Phase III trial. The results are promising and suggest that IMFINZI can offer a new lifeline to patients who have exhausted other treatment options. dMMR tumors are less responsive to conventional chemotherapy, making the success of this combination particularly impactful. Apart from extending progression-free survival, this treatment could potentially become a new standard of care for dMMR endometrial cancer, an area with previously limited advancements.

From a financial standpoint, the FDA approval of IMFINZI for dMMR endometrial cancer enhances AstraZeneca's oncology portfolio and could drive significant revenue growth. The endometrial cancer market in the US involves approximately 66,000 diagnoses annually and the demand for more effective treatments is high. Given the positive trial results, IMFINZI could capture a substantial share of this market. Investors should note the potential for increased sales and positive impacts on AstraZeneca's earnings. However, the costs associated with ongoing trials and the launch of this treatment must also be considered. Additionally, the approval in other regions like the EU and Japan could further bolster revenue streams, contingent on regulatory decisions.

The DUO-E trial highlighted not just the efficacy but also the safety profile of the IMFINZI and chemotherapy regimen. With no new safety signals emerging, the profile is consistent with previous trials. Investors and stakeholders can find reassurance in the manageable adverse effects reported. Monitoring and managing immune-mediated adverse reactions will be important for clinicians. This approval is poised to change the treatment landscape for dMMR endometrial cancer, prioritizing patient needs where survival rates for advanced stages are alarmingly low. The continued assessment of overall survival (OS) as a secondary endpoint in the trial will provide further insights into the long-term benefits of this regimen.

Approval based on DUO-E trial results, which showed IMFINZI reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 58% vs. chemotherapy

WILMINGTON, Del.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- AstraZeneca’s IMFINZI® (durvalumab) in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by IMFINZI monotherapy has been approved in the US as treatment for adult patients with primary advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer that is mismatch repair deficient (dMMR).1

The approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was based on the results of a prespecified exploratory subgroup analysis by MMR status in the DUO-E Phase III trial. Results from DUO-E were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

In the trial, IMFINZI plus carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by IMFINZI monotherapy (IMFINZI arm) reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 58% in patients with dMMR endometrial cancer versus chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio 0.42; 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.80).2

In the US, endometrial cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women, with more than 66,000 patients diagnosed and almost 12,000 deaths in 2022.3,4 Patients diagnosed at an early stage of disease have a five-year survival rate of approximately 80-90%, but there is a significant need for new treatment options for people with advanced disease, where the survival rate falls to less than 20%.5,6

Shannon N. Westin, Professor of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and principal investigator of the trial, said, “With the incidence and mortality of endometrial cancer expected to continue to increase significantly in the coming decades, it is more important than ever that we bring new treatment options to patients at the earliest possible moment in their care. This approval underlines clear evidence that durvalumab plus chemotherapy followed by durvalumab monotherapy delivers important clinical benefits for patients with mismatch repair deficient endometrial cancer.”

Dave Fredrickson, Executive Vice President, Oncology Business Unit, AstraZeneca, said: “There have been limited advances in the treatment of endometrial cancer in the last few decades, and continued innovation is critical as the burden of this cancer is expected to grow in the future. Immunotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is emerging as a new standard of care in this setting, and the approval of IMFINZI offers an important new option for patients with mismatch repair deficient disease.”

The safety and tolerability profile of the IMFINZI and chemotherapy regimen was generally manageable, well tolerated and broadly consistent with prior clinical trials with no new safety signals.1,2

The LYNPARZA® (olaparib) and IMFINZI arm, which investigated IMFINZI plus chemotherapy followed by IMFINZI plus LYNPARZA as maintenance therapy, also met the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). The trial continues to assess OS as a key secondary endpoint for both arms. Regulatory applications for both IMFINZI as well as IMFINZI and LYNPARZA regimens are currently under review in the EU, Japan and several other countries based on the DUO-E results.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

There are no contraindications for IMFINZI® (durvalumab) or IMJUDO® (tremelimumab-actl).

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed under Warnings and Precautions may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated reactions. Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. Immune-mediated adverse reactions can occur at any time after starting treatment or after discontinuation. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and before each dose. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate. Withhold or permanently discontinue IMFINZI and IMJUDO depending on severity. See USPI Dosing and Administration for specific details. In general, if IMFINZI and IMJUDO requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 mg to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis, which may be fatal. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • In patients who did not receive recent prior radiation, the incidence of immune-mediated pneumonitis was 2.4% (34/1414), including fatal (<0.1%), and Grade 3-4 (0.4%) adverse reactions. In patients who received recent prior radiation, the incidence of pneumonitis (including radiation pneumonitis) in patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC following definitive chemoradiation within 42 days prior to initiation of IMFINZI in PACIFIC was 18.3% (87/475) in patients receiving IMFINZI and 12.8% (30/234) in patients receiving placebo. Of the patients who received IMFINZI (475), 1.1% were fatal and 2.7% were Grade 3 adverse reactions.
  • The frequency and severity of immune-mediated pneumonitis in patients who did not receive definitive chemoradiation prior to IMFINZI were similar in patients who received IMFINZI as a single agent or with ES-SCLC or BTC when given in combination with chemotherapy.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
  • Immune‑mediated pneumonitis occurred in 1.3% (5/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including fatal (0.3%) and Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.5% (21/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including fatal (0.5%), and Grade 3 (1%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

IMFINZI with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal.

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated colitis that is frequently associated with diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2% (37/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 4 (<0.1%) and Grade 3 (0.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune‑mediated colitis or diarrhea occurred in 6% (23/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (3.6%) adverse reactions. Intestinal perforation has been observed in other studies of IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 6.5% (39/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy including fatal (0.2%) and Grade 3 (2.5%) adverse reactions. Intestinal perforation and large intestine perforation were reported in 0.1% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated hepatitis, which may be fatal.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 2.8% (52/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including fatal (0.2%), Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
  • Immune‑mediated hepatitis occurred in 7.5% (29/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including fatal (0.8%), Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (4.1%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
  • Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 3.9% (23/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including fatal (0.3%), Grade 4 (0.5%), and Grade 3 (2%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

  • Adrenal Insufficiency: IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.5% (9/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1.5% (6/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 2.2% (13/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.8%) adverse reactions.
  • Hypophysitis: IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field cuts. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate symptomatic treatment including hormone replacement as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Grade 3 hypophysitis/hypopituitarism occurred in <0.1% (1/1889) of patients who received IMFINZI.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Immune-mediated hypophysitis/hypopituitarism occurred in 1% (4/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated hypophysitis occurred in 1.3% (8/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • Thyroid Disorders (Thyroiditis, Hyperthyroidism, and Hypothyroidism): IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement therapy for hypothyroidism or institute medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 0.5% (9/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
  • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.1% (39/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI.
  • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 8.3% (156/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 1.5% (6/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
    • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 4.6% (18/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
    • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 11% (42/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 1.2% (7/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy.
    • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 5% (30/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.
    • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 8.6% (51/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 14% (34/235) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel.
  • Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis: Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.
  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Grade 3 immune-mediated Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in <0.1% (1/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Two patients (0.5%, 2/388) had events of hyperglycemia requiring insulin therapy that had not resolved at last follow-up.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in 0.5% (3/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated nephritis.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.5% (10/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
  • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 1% (4/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.7% (4/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Dermatology Reactions

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), has occurred with PD-1/L-1 and CTLA-4 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 1.8% (34/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (0.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
  • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 4.9% (19/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.5%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
  • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 7.2% (43/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Pancreatitis

IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated pancreatitis. Immune-mediated pancreatitis occurred in 2.3% (9/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.5%) adverse reactions.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant, immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of less than 1% each in patients who received IMFINZI and IMJUDO or were reported with the use of other immune-checkpoint inhibitors.

  • Cardiac/vascular: Myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis.
  • Nervous system: Meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy.
  • Ocular: Uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment to include blindness can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.
  • Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis including increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis.
  • Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: Myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatic.
  • Endocrine: Hypoparathyroidism.
  • Other (hematologic/immune): Hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenia, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions. Monitor for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt, slow the rate of, or permanently discontinue IMFINZI and IMJUDO based on the severity. See USPI Dosing and Administration for specific details. For Grade 1 or 2 infusion-related reactions, consider using pre-medications with subsequent doses.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
  • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (42/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
  • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 10 (2.6%) patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
  • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.9% (17/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Complications of Allogeneic HSCT after IMFINZI

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/L-1 blocking antibody. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/L-1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT. Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/L-1 blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on their mechanism of action and data from animal studies, IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. In females of reproductive potential, verify pregnancy status prior to initiating IMFINZI and IMJUDO and advise them to use effective contraception during treatment with IMFINZI and IMJUDO and for 3 months after the last dose of IMFINZI and IMJUDO.

Lactation

There is no information regarding the presence of IMFINZI and IMJUDO in human milk; however, because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from IMFINZI and IMJUDO, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

  • In patients with Stage III NSCLC in the PACIFIC study receiving IMFINZI (n=475), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were cough (40%), fatigue (34%), pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis (34%), upper respiratory tract infections (26%), dyspnea (25%), and rash (23%). The most common Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (≥3%) were pneumonia (7%) and pneumonitis/radiation pneumonitis (3.4%).
  • In patients with Stage III NSCLC in the PACIFIC study receiving IMFINZI (n=475), discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred in 15% of patients in the IMFINZI arm. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 29% of patients receiving IMFINZI. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥2%) were pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis (7%) and pneumonia (6%). Fatal pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis and fatal pneumonia occurred in <2% of patients and were similar across arms.
  • In patients with mNSCLC in the POSEIDON study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO plus platinum-based chemotherapy (n=330), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were nausea (42%), fatigue (36%), musculoskeletal pain (29%), decreased appetite (28%), rash (27%), and diarrhea (22%).
  • In patients with mNSCLC in the POSEIDON study receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy (n=330), permanent discontinuation of IMFINZI or IMJUDO due to an adverse reaction occurred in 17% of patients. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients, with the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients being pneumonia (11%), anemia (5%), diarrhea (2.4%), thrombocytopenia (2.4%), pyrexia (2.4%), and febrile neutropenia (2.1%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in a total of 4.2% of patients.
  • In patients with extensive-stage SCLC in the CASPIAN study receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy (n=265), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were nausea (34%), fatigue/asthenia (32%), and alopecia (31%). The most common Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction (≥3%) was fatigue/asthenia (3.4%).
  • In patients with extensive-stage SCLC in the CASPIAN study receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy (n=265), IMFINZI was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 7% of the patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 31% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 1% of patients were febrile neutropenia (4.5%), pneumonia (2.3%), anemia (1.9%), pancytopenia (1.5%), pneumonitis (1.1%), and COPD (1.1%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4.9% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy.
  • In patients with locally advanced or metastatic BTC in the TOPAZ-1 study receiving IMFINZI (n=338), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were fatigue (42%), nausea (40%), constipation (32%), decreased appetite (26%), abdominal pain (24%), rash (23%), and pyrexia (20%).
  • In patients with locally advanced or metastatic BTC in the TOPAZ-1 study receiving IMFINZI (n=338), discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred in 6% of the patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients were cholangitis (7%), pyrexia (3.8%), anemia (3.6%), sepsis (3.3%) and acute kidney injury (2.4%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3.6% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. These include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (4 patients), sepsis (2 patients), and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (2 patients).
  • In patients with unresectable HCC in the HIMALAYA study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO (n=388), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were rash (32%), diarrhea (27%), fatigue (26%), pruritus (23%), musculoskeletal pain (22%), and abdominal pain (20%).
  • In patients with unresectable HCC in the HIMALAYA study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO (n=388), serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients included hemorrhage (6%), diarrhea (4%), sepsis (2.1%), pneumonia (2.1%), rash (1.5%), vomiting (1.3%), acute kidney injury (1.3%), and anemia (1.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 8% of patients who received IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including death (1%), hemorrhage intracranial (0.5%), cardiac arrest (0.5%), pneumonitis (0.5%), hepatic failure (0.5%), and immune-mediated hepatitis (0.5%). Permanent discontinuation of treatment regimen due to an adverse reaction occurred in 14% of patients.
  • In patients with advanced or recurrent dMMR endometrial cancer in the DUO-E study receiving IMFINZI in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by IMFINZI as a single-agent (n=44), the most common adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities (occurring in >20% of patients) were peripheral neuropathy (61%), musculoskeletal pain (59%), nausea (59%), alopecia (52%), fatigue (41%), abdominal pain (39%), constipation (39%), rash (39%), decreased magnesium (36%), increased ALT (32%), increased AST (30%), diarrhea (27%), vomiting (27%), cough (27%), decreased potassium (25%), dyspnea (25%), headache (23%), increased alkaline phosphatase (20%), and decreased appetite (18%). The most common Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (≥3%) were constipation (4.5%) and fatigue (4.5%).
  • In patients with advanced or recurrent dMMR endometrial cancer in the DUO-E study receiving IMFINZI in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by IMFINZI as a single-agent (n=44), permanent discontinuation of IMFINZI due to adverse reactions occurred in 11% of patients. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients who received IMFINZI with carboplatin and paclitaxel; the most common serious adverse reactions (≥4%) were constipation (4.5%) and rash (4.5%).

The safety and effectiveness of IMFINZI and IMJUDO have not been established in pediatric patients.

Indications:

IMFINZI is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has not progressed following concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

IMFINZI, in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic NSCLC with no sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations.

IMFINZI, in combination with etoposide and either carboplatin or cisplatin, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC).

IMFINZI, in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC).

IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC).

IMFINZI in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by IMFINZI as a single agent is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with primary advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer that is mismatch repair deficient (dMMR).

Please see Full Prescribing Information including Medication Guide for IMFINZI and IMJUDO.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR LYNPARZA® (olaparib)

CONTRAINDICATIONS

There are no contraindications for LYNPARZA.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Myelodysplastic Syndrome/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (MDS/AML): Occurred in approximately 1.2% of patients with various BRCAm, gBRCAm, HRR gene-mutated or HRD-positive cancers who received LYNPARZA as a single agent or as part of a combination regimen, consistent with the approved indications, and the majority of events had a fatal outcome. The median duration of therapy in patients who developed MDS/AML was approximately 2 years (range: <6 months to >4 years). All of these patients had previous chemotherapy with platinum agents and/or other DNA-damaging agents, including radiotherapy.

In SOLO-1, patients with newly diagnosed advanced BRCAm ovarian cancer, the incidence of MDS/AML was 1.9% (5/260) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 0.8% (1/130) in patients who received placebo based on an updated analysis. In PAOLA-1, of patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer with HRD-positive status, the incidence of MDS/AML was 1.6% (4/255) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 2.3% (3/131) in the control arm.

In SOLO-2, patients with BRCAm platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer, the incidence of MDS/AML was 8% (15/195) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 4% (4/99) in patients who received placebo. The duration of LYNPARZA treatment prior to the diagnosis of MDS/AML ranged from 0.6 years to 4.5 years.

Do not start LYNPARZA until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (≤Grade 1). Monitor complete blood count for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment. For prolonged hematological toxicities, interrupt LYNPARZA and monitor blood count weekly until recovery.

If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample for cytogenetics. Discontinue LYNPARZA if MDS/AML is confirmed.

Pneumonitis: Occurred in 0.8% of patients exposed to LYNPARZA monotherapy, and some cases were fatal. If patients present with new or worsening respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and fever, or a radiological abnormality occurs, interrupt LYNPARZA treatment and initiate prompt investigation. Discontinue LYNPARZA if pneumonitis is confirmed and treat patient appropriately.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): Including severe or fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) occurred in patients treated with LYNPARZA. In the combined data of two randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies (PROfound and PROpel) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (N=1180), VTE occurred in 8% of patients who received LYNPARZA, including pulmonary embolism in 6%. In the control arms, VTE occurred in 2.5%, including pulmonary embolism in 1.5%. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and treat as medically appropriate, which may include long-term anticoagulation as clinically indicated.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, LYNPARZA can cause fetal harm. Verify pregnancy status in females of reproductive potential prior to initiating treatment.

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus and to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose.

Males

Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential or who are pregnant to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months following the last dose of LYNPARZA and to not donate sperm during this time.

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance BRCAm Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for SOLO-1 were: nausea (77%), fatigue (67%), abdominal pain (45%), vomiting (40%), anemia (38%), diarrhea (37%), constipation (28%), upper respiratory tract infection/influenza/nasopharyngitis/bronchitis (28%), dysgeusia (26%), decreased appetite (20%), dizziness (20%), neutropenia (17%), dyspepsia (17%), dyspnea (15%), leukopenia (13%), urinary tract infection (13%), thrombocytopenia (11%), and stomatitis (11%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for SOLO-1 were: decrease in hemoglobin (87%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (87%), decrease in leukocytes (70%), decrease in lymphocytes (67%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (51%), decrease in platelets (35%), and increase in serum creatinine (34%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Combination with Bevacizumab

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients treated with LYNPARZA/bevacizumab and at a ≥5% frequency compared to placebo/bevacizumab in the first-line maintenance setting for PAOLA-1 were: nausea (53%), fatigue (including asthenia) (53%), anemia (41%), lymphopenia (24%), vomiting (22%), and leukopenia (18%). In addition, the most common adverse reactions (≥10%) for patients receiving LYNPARZA/bevacizumab irrespective of the frequency compared with the placebo/bevacizumab arm were: diarrhea (18%), neutropenia (18%), urinary tract infection (15%), and headache (14%).

In addition, venous thromboembolism occurred more commonly in patients receiving LYNPARZA/bevacizumab (5%) than in those receiving placebo/bevacizumab (1.9%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients for LYNPARZA in combination with bevacizumab in the first-line maintenance setting for PAOLA-1 were: decrease in hemoglobin (79%), decrease in lymphocytes (63%), increase in serum creatinine (61%), decrease in leukocytes (59%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (35%), and decrease in platelets (35%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Maintenance gBRCAm Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the maintenance setting for SOLO-2 were: nausea (76%), fatigue (including asthenia) (66%), anemia (44%), vomiting (37%), nasopharyngitis/upper respiratory tract infection (URI)/influenza (36%), diarrhea (33%), arthralgia/myalgia (30%), dysgeusia (27%), headache (26%), decreased appetite (22%), and stomatitis (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the maintenance setting for SOLO-2 were: increase in mean corpuscular volume (89%), decrease in hemoglobin (83%), decrease in leukocytes (69%), decrease in lymphocytes (67%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (51%), increase in serum creatinine (44%), and decrease in platelets (42%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Adjuvant Treatment of gBRCAm, HER2-Negative, High-Risk Early Breast Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: nausea (57%), fatigue (including asthenia) (42%), anemia (24%), vomiting (23%), headache (20%), diarrhea (18%), leukopenia (17%), neutropenia (16%), decreased appetite (13%), dysgeusia (12%), dizziness (11%), and stomatitis (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: decrease in lymphocytes (77%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (67%), decrease in hemoglobin (65%), decrease in leukocytes (64%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (39%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—gBRCAm, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the metastatic setting for OlympiAD were: nausea (58%), anemia (40%), fatigue (including asthenia) (37%), vomiting (30%), neutropenia (27%), respiratory tract infection (27%), leukopenia (25%), diarrhea (21%), and headache (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the metastatic setting for OlympiAD were: decrease in hemoglobin (82%), decrease in lymphocytes (73%), decrease in leukocytes (71%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (71%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (46%), and decrease in platelets (33%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance gBRCAm Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for POLO were: fatigue (60%), nausea (45%), abdominal pain (34%), diarrhea (29%), anemia (27%), decreased appetite (25%), constipation (23%), vomiting (20%), back pain (19%), arthralgia (15%), rash (15%), thrombocytopenia (14%), dyspnea (13%), neutropenia (12%), nasopharyngitis (12%), dysgeusia (11%), and stomatitis (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for POLO were: increase in serum creatinine (99%), decrease in hemoglobin (86%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (71%), decrease in lymphocytes (61%), decrease in platelets (56%), decrease in leukocytes (50%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (25%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—HRR Gene-mutated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA for PROfound were: anemia (46%), fatigue (including asthenia) (41%), nausea (41%), decreased appetite (30%), diarrhea (21%), vomiting (18%), thrombocytopenia (12%), cough (11%), and dyspnea (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA for PROfound were: decrease in hemoglobin (98%), decrease in lymphocytes (62%), decrease in leukocytes (53%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (34%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Combination with Abiraterone and Prednisone or Prednisolone

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA/abiraterone with a difference of ≥5% compared to placebo for PROpel were: anemia (48%), fatigue (including asthenia) (38%), nausea (30%), diarrhea (19%), decreased appetite (16%), lymphopenia (14%), dizziness (14%), and abdominal pain (13%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA/abiraterone for PROpel were: decrease in hemoglobin (97%), decrease in lymphocytes (70%), decrease in platelets (23%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (23%).

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Anticancer Agents: Clinical studies of LYNPARZA with other myelosuppressive anticancer agents, including DNA-damaging agents, indicate a potentiation and prolongation of myelosuppressive toxicity.

CYP3A Inhibitors: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors when using LYNPARZA. If a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor must be coadministered, reduce the dose of LYNPARZA. Advise patients to avoid grapefruit, grapefruit juice, Seville oranges, and Seville orange juice during LYNPARZA treatment.

CYP3A Inducers: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers when using LYNPARZA.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Lactation: No data are available regarding the presence of olaparib in human milk, its effects on the breastfed infant or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed infant, advise a lactating woman not to breastfeed during treatment with LYNPARZA and for 1 month after receiving the final dose.

Pediatric Use: The safety and efficacy of LYNPARZA have not been established in pediatric patients.

Hepatic Impairment: No adjustment to the starting dose is required in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification A and B). There are no data in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification C).

Renal Impairment: No dosage modification is recommended in patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr 51-80 mL/min estimated by Cockcroft-Gault). In patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr 31-50 mL/min), reduce the dose of LYNPARZA to 200 mg twice daily. There are no data in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (CLcr ≤30 mL/min).

INDICATIONS

LYNPARZA is a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor indicated:

First-Line Maintenance BRCAm Advanced Ovarian Cancer

For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm or sBRCAm) advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

First-Line Maintenance HRD-Positive Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Combination with Bevacizumab

In combination with bevacizumab for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who are in complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy and whose cancer is associated with homologous recombination deficiency (HRD)-positive status defined by either:

  • a deleterious or suspected deleterious BRCA mutation, and/or
  • genomic instability

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Maintenance BRCA-mutated Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm or sBRCAm) recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Adjuvant Treatment of gBRCAm, HER2-Negative, High-Risk Early Breast Cancer

For the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, high-risk early breast cancer who have been treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

gBRCAm, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

For the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative metastatic breast cancer who have been treated with chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or metastatic setting. Patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer should have been treated with a prior endocrine therapy or be considered inappropriate for endocrine therapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

First-Line Maintenance gBRCAm Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma whose disease has not progressed on at least 16 weeks of a first-line platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

HRR Gene-mutated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

For the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic homologous recombination repair (HRR) gene-mutated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who have progressed following prior treatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

BRCAm Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Combination with Abiraterone and Prednisone or Prednisolone

In combination with abiraterone and prednisone or prednisolone (abi/pred) for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious BRCA-mutated (BRCAm) metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

Notes

Endometrial cancer

Endometrial cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease that originates in the tissue lining of the uterus and is most common in women who have already been through menopause, with the average age at diagnosis being over 60 years old.7-10 It is the sixth most common cancer in women worldwide.11,12 Incidence and mortality of endometrial cancer are expected to increase by approximately 61% and 87% respectively (from 420,400 cases and 97,700 deaths in 2022 to 676,300 cases and 183,100 deaths) in 2050.13

The majority of patients with endometrial cancer are diagnosed at an early stage of disease, where the cancer is confined to the uterus.9,10 They are typically treated with surgery and/or radiation, and the five-year survival rate is high (approximately 80-90%).5,6 Patients with advanced disease (Stage III-IV) usually have a much poorer prognosis, with the five-year survival rate falling to less than 20%.5,6 Immunotherapy combined with chemotherapy is emerging as a new standard of care for advanced endometrial cancer, particularly for patients with dMMR disease, who make up approximately 20-30% of all patients with this type of cancer.6,14,15,16 There remains a high unmet need for treatments for the remaining 70-80% of endometrial cancer patients with pMMR disease.15,16

DUO-E

The DUO-E trial (GOG 3041/ENGOT-EN10) is a three-arm, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter Phase III trial of 1st-line IMFINZI® (durvalumab) plus platinum-based chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) followed by either IMFINZI monotherapy or IMFINZI plus LYNPARZA® (olaparib) as maintenance therapy versus platinum-based chemotherapy alone as a treatment for patients with newly diagnosed advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.

The DUO-E trial randomized 699 patients with newly diagnosed advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial carcinoma to receive either IMFINZI (1120mg) or placebo, given every three weeks in addition to standard-of-care platinum-based chemotherapy. After 4-6 cycles of chemotherapy, patients (whose disease had not progressed) then received either IMFINZI (1500mg) or placebo every four weeks as maintenance, plus 300mg LYNPARZA (300mg BID [2x150mg tablets, twice a day]) or placebo until disease progression.

The dual primary endpoint was PFS of each treatment arm versus standard of care. Key secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), safety and tolerability. The trial continues to assess OS for both IMFINZI monotherapy and IMFINZI plus LYNPARZA as maintenance therapy in the overall trial population. Mismatch repair (MMR) status, recurrence status and geographic location were stratification factors. The trial was sponsored independently by AstraZeneca and conducted in 253 study locations across 22 countries including the US, Europe, South America and Asia.

For more information about the trial, please visit ClinicalTrials.gov.

IMFINZI® (durvalumab)

IMFINZI® (durvalumab) is a human monoclonal antibody that binds to the PD-L1 protein and blocks the interaction of PD-L1 with the PD-1 and CD80 proteins, countering the tumor’s immune-evading tactics and releasing the inhibition of immune responses.

In addition to its indications in unresectable, Stage III NSCLC and ES-SCLC, IMFINZI is currently approved in a number of countries in combination with a short course of IMJUDO® (tremelimumab-actl) and chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

IMFINZI is also approved in a number of countries in combination with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer and in combination with IMJUDO in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). IMFINZI is also approved as a monotherapy in unresectable HCC in Japan and the EU.

Since the first approval in May 2017, more than 220,000 patients have been treated with IMFINZI. As part of a broad development program, IMFINZI is being tested as a single treatment and in combinations with other anti-cancer treatments for patients with SCLC, NSCLC, bladder cancer, breast cancer, several gastrointestinal cancers and other solid tumors.

AstraZeneca in immuno-oncology (IO)

AstraZeneca is a pioneer in introducing the concept of immunotherapy into dedicated clinical areas of high unmet medical need. The Company has a comprehensive and diverse IO portfolio and pipeline anchored in immunotherapies designed to overcome evasion of the anti-tumor immune response and stimulate the body’s immune system to attack tumors.

AstraZeneca aims to reimagine cancer care and help transform outcomes for patients with IMFINZI® (durvalumab) as monotherapy and in combination with IMJUDO® (tremelimumab-actl) as well as other novel immunotherapies and modalities. The Company is also exploring next-generation immunotherapies like bispecific antibodies and therapeutics that harness different aspects of immunity to target cancer.

AstraZeneca is boldly pursuing an innovative clinical strategy to bring IO-based therapies that deliver long-term survival to new settings across a wide range of cancer types. With an extensive clinical program, the Company also champions the use of IO treatment in earlier disease stages, where there is the greatest potential for cure.

AstraZeneca in oncology

AstraZeneca is leading a revolution in oncology with the ambition to provide cures for cancer in every form, following the science to understand cancer and all its complexities to discover, develop and deliver life-changing medicines to patients.

The Company’s focus is on some of the most challenging cancers. It is through persistent innovation that AstraZeneca has built one of the most diverse portfolios and pipelines in the industry, with the potential to catalyze changes in the practice of medicine and transform the patient experience.

AstraZeneca has the vision to redefine cancer care and, one day, eliminate cancer as a cause of death.

AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca is a global, science-led biopharmaceutical company that focuses on the discovery, development, and commercialization of prescription medicines in Oncology, Rare Diseases and BioPharmaceuticals, including Cardiovascular, Renal & Metabolism, and Respiratory & Immunology. Based in Cambridge, UK, AstraZeneca's innovative medicines are sold in more than 125 countries and used by millions of patients worldwide. Please visit www.astrazeneca-us.com and follow the Company on social media @AstraZeneca.

References

1. Imfinzi (durvalumab) US prescribing information; Jun 2024.

2. Shannon N. Westin et al. Durvalumab Plus Carboplatin/Paclitaxel Followed by Maintenance Durvalumab With or Without Olaparib as First-Line Treatment for Advanced Endometrial Cancer: The Phase III DUO-E Trial. JCO 42, 283-299(2024).

3. World Health Organization. IARC. Absolute numbers, Incidence, Females, in 2022. United States of America. Available at: https://gco.iarc.fr/today/en/dataviz/pie?mode=cancer&cancers=24&sexes=2&group_populations=1&populations=840. Accessed Jun 2024.

4. World Health Organization. IARC. Corpus Uteri. Estimated numbers from 2022 to 2050, United States, Females, age [0-85+]. Available at: https://gco.iarc.who.int/tomorrow/en/dataviz/trends?multiple_populations=1&cancers=24&populations=840. Accessed Jun 2024.

5. Cao SY, et al. Recurrence and survival of patients with stage III endometrial cancer after radical surgery followed by adjuvant chemo- or chemoradiotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Cancer. 2023 Jan 9;23(1):31.

6. Haj Hamoud B, et al. The Evolving Landscape Of Immunotherapy In Uterine Cancer: A Comprehensive Review. Life. 2023;13(7):1502.

7. Dork T, et al. Genetic Susceptibility to Endometrial Cancer: Risk Factors and Clinical Management. Cancers (Basel). 2020;12(9):2407.

8. American Cancer Society. What is Endometrial Cancer? Available at https://www.cancer.org/cancer/endometrial-cancer/about/what-is-endometrial-cancer.html. Accessed Jun 2024.

9. Oakin A, et al. ESMO Guidelines. Endometrial Cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-Up. Ann Oncol. 2022;33(9):860-877.

10. Cancer.Net. Uterine Cancer: Statistics. Available at: https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/uterine-cancer/statistics. Accessed Jun 2024.

11. World Cancer Research Fund International. Endometrial Cancer Statistics. Available at https://www.wcrf.org/cancer-trends/endometrial-cancer-statistics/. Accessed Jun 2024.

12. World Health Organization. IARC. Corpus Uteri. Absolute numbers, Incidence, Females in 2022. Available at: https://gco.iarc.who.int/today/en/dataviz/pie?mode=cancer&group_populations=1&populations=900&sexes=2. Accessed Jun 2024.

13. World Health Organization. IARC. Corpus Uteri. Estimated Numbers From 2022 To 2050, Females, Age [0-85+] World. Available at { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "name": "IMFINZI® (durvalumab) plus chemotherapy approved in the US for mismatch repair deficient advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer FAQs", "mainEntity": [ { "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the recent FDA approval concerning AZN?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The FDA recently approved IMFINZI® (durvalumab) in combination with chemotherapy for mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "What were the findings of the DUO-E Phase III trial for AZN?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The DUO-E Phase III trial found that IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 58% compared to chemotherapy alone for dMMR advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the significance of AZN's new treatment approval?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The approval of IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy is significant due to the advances in endometrial cancer treatment and the high mortality rate for advanced stages." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the common adverse reactions associated with IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Common adverse reactions include peripheral neuropathy, musculoskeletal pain, nausea, alopecia, fatigue, abdominal pain, constipation, and rash." } }, { "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the safety profile of IMFINZI® in the DUO-E trial?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The safety profile of IMFINZI® in combination with chemotherapy was generally manageable and consistent with previous trials, though 30% of patients experienced serious adverse reactions." } } ] }

FAQ

What is the recent FDA approval concerning AZN?

The FDA recently approved IMFINZI® (durvalumab) in combination with chemotherapy for mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.

What were the findings of the DUO-E Phase III trial for AZN?

The DUO-E Phase III trial found that IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 58% compared to chemotherapy alone for dMMR advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.

What is the significance of AZN's new treatment approval?

The approval of IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy is significant due to the advances in endometrial cancer treatment and the high mortality rate for advanced stages.

What are the common adverse reactions associated with IMFINZI® plus chemotherapy?

Common adverse reactions include peripheral neuropathy, musculoskeletal pain, nausea, alopecia, fatigue, abdominal pain, constipation, and rash.

What is the safety profile of IMFINZI® in the DUO-E trial?

The safety profile of IMFINZI® in combination with chemotherapy was generally manageable and consistent with previous trials, though 30% of patients experienced serious adverse reactions.

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