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AstraZeneca furthers ambition to transform outcomes in early lung cancer and ​redefine metastatic breast cancer treatment at ASCO 2024​

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AstraZeneca is set to present new data from its oncology portfolio at the ASCO 2024 Annual Meeting.

Key highlights include results from the LAURA and ADRIATIC Phase III trials of TAGRISSO® (osimertinib) and IMFINZI® (durvalumab) for early lung cancer.

The DESTINY-Breast06 trial will showcase ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) for HR-positive, HER2-low breast cancer.

Other notable presentations include data on novel therapies like C-CAR031 and updates from I-SPY2.2 Phase II trials.

This reinforces AstraZeneca's commitment to transforming cancer treatment across various stages and types.

Positive
  • Significant PFS benefit for TAGRISSO in unresectable, Stage III EGFRm NSCLC from the LAURA Phase III trial.
  • IMFINZI showed statistically significant OS and PFS benefit in LS-SCLC patients from the ADRIATIC Phase III trial.
  • DESTINY-Breast06 trial demonstrated a meaningful improvement in PFS for ENHERTU in HR-positive, HER2-low breast cancer.
  • Positive interim analysis from DESTINY-Breast07 trial for ENHERTU in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.
  • Significant PFS improvement for datopotamab deruxtecan versus chemotherapy in the TROPION-Breast01 trial.
Negative
  • TAGRISSO-associated risks include ILD/pneumonitis (4% occurrence, 0.4% fatal), QTc interval prolongation, and cardiomyopathy.
  • Potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from TAGRISSO.
  • Adverse reactions include leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, diarrhea, rash, musculoskeletal pain, neutropenia, nail toxicity, dry skin, stomatitis, and fatigue.

The new clinical data from AstraZeneca, including Phase III trials for TAGRISSO® and IMFINZI®, highlights significant progress in treating lung and breast cancer. For retail investors, the potential market expansion due to these results is noteworthy. In particular, $10 billion in annual revenue could be driven by positive outcomes in early and metastatic cancer treatments.

The short-term impact includes potential stock price appreciation as market sentiment reacts positively to the trial results. Clearly, the company is advancing its goal to dominate oncology treatments, indicated by the extensive research and promising trial data.

Long-term implications involve increased market share and revenue stability. However, investors should stay cautious of regulatory risks and the significant competition within the oncology market.

Investors should understand terms like progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), which refer to the length of time patients live without disease progression and the time from treatment until death, respectively. These metrics are important for assessing drug efficacy.

The results from the LAURA and ADRIATIC Phase III trials are particularly promising. TAGRISSO® showed a significant progression-free survival (PFS) benefit in patients with unresectable, Stage III EGFR-mutated NSCLC after chemoradiotherapy. This suggests a move towards more effective early-stage treatment, potentially altering treatment guidelines and improving patient outcomes.

IMFINZI® also demonstrated notable benefits in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), with clinically meaningful improvements in overall survival (OS). For the medical community, this indicates a shift from traditional chemotherapy to more targeted immunotherapy, improving survival rates and patient quality of life.

The data also highlights the potential for ENHERTU® in treating HR-positive, HER2-low and HER2-ultralow breast cancer, expanding the treatment landscape. Understanding these clinical indicators helps investors grasp the medical efficacy and potential adoption rates of these treatments.

AstraZeneca’s presentation at ASCO 2024 showcases the breadth of its oncology pipeline. The focus on novel therapies like datopotamab deruxtecan and the innovative CAR-T therapy highlights the company’s commitment to leading-edge cancer treatments.

Investors should note the emphasis on antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), which combine the targeting capabilities of antibodies with the cancer-killing ability of cytotoxic drugs. This approach is gaining traction due to its precision and reduced side effects compared to traditional chemotherapy.

The development of AZD5851 and collaboration with AbelZeta Pharmaceuticals for a CAR-T therapy targeting GPC3 in liver cancer demonstrates AstraZeneca's investment in next-generation therapies, potentially leading to substantial long-term revenue streams. Understanding these advanced treatment modalities and their market potential can help investors appreciate the company’s future growth prospects.

Back-to-back plenary presentations from LAURA and ADRIATIC Phase III trials reinforce the potential of TAGRISSO® (osimertinib) and IMFINZI® (durvalumab) in early lung cancer settings​

DESTINY-Breast06 data underscore potential of ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) earlier in HR-positive, HER2-low breast cancer treatment, and in a broader population including HER2-ultralow

WILMINGTON, Del.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- AstraZeneca advances its ambition to redefine cancer care with new data across its industry-leading portfolio and pipeline at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, May 31 to June 4, 2024.

More than 100 abstracts will feature 25 approved and potential new medicines across the Company’s diverse oncology portfolio and pipeline, including two late-breaking plenary presentations, a special late-breaking abstract session presentation and 15 oral presentations. Highlights include:

  • LAURA Phase III trial of TAGRISSO® (osimertinib) in unresectable, Stage III epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated (EGFRm) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (Plenary LBA4).
  • ADRIATIC Phase III trial of IMFINZI® (durvalumab) in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) who had not progressed following concurrent CRT (cCRT) (Plenary LBA5).
  • DESTINY-Breast06 Phase III trial of ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) in patients with metastatic hormone receptor (HR)-positive HER2-low and HER2-ultralow metastatic breast cancer following one or more lines of endocrine therapy (LBA1000).
  • First-in-human, investigator-initiated trial of C-CAR031, a novel autologous armored Glypican 3 (GPC3) targeting chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy, in patients with liver cancer. The CAR-T is based on AZD5851, a novel cell therapy designed by AstraZeneca (Rapid Oral Abstract 4019).
  • Two late-breaking presentations from the externally sponsored I-SPY2.2 Phase II trial of neoadjuvant datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd), alone and in combination with IMFINZI, in patients with breast cancer (LBA501 and LBA509).

Dave Fredrickson, Executive Vice President, Oncology Business Unit, AstraZeneca, said: “Our plenary data at ASCO show the pioneering role of our medicines in curative-intent lung cancer treatment and highlight progress toward our continued ambition to have a medicine for more than half of all patients treated for lung cancer by 2030. The overwhelming efficacy in the LAURA trial will add to the extensive body of evidence for TAGRISSO in EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer, and the impressive survival data from ADRIATIC will show the potential of IMFINZI to transform outcomes in limited-stage small cell lung cancer.”

Susan Galbraith, Executive Vice President, Oncology R&D, AstraZeneca, said: “Data from our antibody drug conjugates at ASCO underscore the opportunity to replace traditional chemotherapy with these medicines for many patients as we expand their use to new populations. DESTINY-Breast06 results will demonstrate the potential to treat patients across a broader spectrum of HR-positive metastatic breast cancer with ENHERTU, including those with HER2-ultralow expression who have never had access to HER2-directed therapy before. We're also excited by the I-SPY2.2 efficacy and tolerability data for datopotamab deruxtecan plus IMFINZI, which will show the potential of combining antibody drug conjugates with immunotherapy in the early-stage setting.”

Transforming treatment expectations across earlier-stage lung cancer settings
Several presentations will reinforce the Company’s progress toward moving lung cancer treatment to earlier stages of disease. These include:

  • A late-breaking plenary presentation showcasing progression-free survival (PFS) results from the LAURA Phase III trial evaluating TAGRISSO in unresectable, Stage III EGFRm NSCLC after CRT. In February, high-level results showed a statistically significant and highly clinically meaningful PFS benefit for TAGRISSO in this setting.
  • A late-breaking plenary presentation highlighting overall survival (OS) and PFS results from the ADRIATIC Phase III trial of IMFINZI in patients with LS-SCLC who had not progressed following cCRT. In April, high-level results from an interim analysis showed a statistically significant and clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefit for IMFINZI in this setting.
  • An oral presentation of an analysis from the ADAURA Phase III trial of TAGRISSO in the adjuvant treatment of early-stage (IB, II and IIIA) EGFRm NSCLC, assessing the potential for circulating tumor DNA-based molecular residual disease to predict disease recurrence.
  • A rapid oral presentation of an exploratory analysis from the AEGEAN Phase III trial of IMFINZI-based treatment before and after surgery in patients with resectable early-stage (IIA-IIIB) NSCLC, evaluating efficacy in patients with N2 disease (cancer in the lymph nodes on the same side as the affected lung or between the lungs).
  • A poster presentation of updated OS, PFS and safety results from the COAST Phase II trial of IMFINZI in combination with novel immunotherapies oleclumab, an anti-CD73 monoclonal antibody, and monalizumab, an anti-NKG2A monoclonal antibody, in unresectable, Stage III NSCLC, supporting the PACIFIC-9 Phase III trial in this patient population.

In metastatic lung cancer, the Company will present data that underscore its commitment to extending the benefits of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) to more patients. A poster presentation will share updated safety and efficacy results, including PD-L1 expression, from the TROPION-Lung02 Phase Ib trial of datopotamab deruxtecan plus pembrolizumab with or without platinum chemotherapy as 1st-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC without actionable genomic alterations. These data build on previously presented results from the TROPION-Lung-1 Phase III trial demonstrating the potential of this novel ADC in advanced disease. Datopotamab deruxtecan in combination with immunotherapies is being further explored in multiple Phase III trials in this setting, including AVANZAR, TROPION-Lung07 and TROPION-Lung08.

Redefining the breast cancer treatment landscape with ADCs across subtypes and stages of disease
A late-breaking presentation will showcase efficacy and safety outcomes from the DESTINY-Breast06 Phase III trial. In April, high-level results showed ENHERTU demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS versus standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with HR-positive, HER2-low metastatic breast cancer. A clinically meaningful PFS improvement was also seen in patients with HER2-ultralow expression.

An oral presentation will spotlight data from an interim analysis of the dose-expansion phase of the DESTINY-Breast07 Phase 1b/II trial assessing ENHERTU alone or in combination with pertuzumab as 1st-line treatment in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. These regimens are being further explored in the DESTINY-Breast09 Phase III clinical trial.

Additionally, a poster presentation will share updated OS and PFS results from the DESTINY-Breast03 Phase III trial of ENHERTU versus trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer previously treated with trastuzumab and a taxane.

An oral presentation will feature patient-reported outcomes data from the TROPION-Breast01 Phase III trial of datopotamab deruxtecan in patients with inoperable or metastatic HR-positive, HER2-low or negative breast cancer previously treated with endocrine-based therapy and at least one systemic therapy. Previously presented primary results from TROPION-Breast01 showed datopotamab deruxtecan demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS versus investigator’s choice of chemotherapy.

Two late-breaking presentations of results from the externally sponsored I-SPY2.2 Phase II trial will highlight the rates of pathological complete response associated with neoadjuvant datopotamab deruxtecan, alone and in combination with IMFINZI, across breast cancer subtypes.

Advancing the next wave of medicines and combination therapies to attack cancer from multiple angles
A rapid oral presentation will spotlight safety and preliminary efficacy results from an investigator-initiated Trial of C-CAR031, a novel autologous armored Glypican 3 (GPC3) targeting chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy that is being investigated for hepatocellular carcinoma. The CAR-T is based on AZD5851, a novel cell therapy designed by AstraZeneca using their transforming growth factor-beta receptor II (TGFβRII) dominant negative armoring platform and is manufactured by AbelZeta Pharmaceuticals Inc. C-CAR031 is being developed in China under a co-development agreement between AbelZeta and AstraZeneca. AstraZeneca’s TGFβRII dominant negative armoring is designed to resist the immuno-suppressive tumor microenvironment and enhance the potential effectiveness of CAR-Ts in solid tumors.

A rapid abstract update will feature updated efficacy data from a Phase I trial of AZD0901, a potential first-in-class ADC targeting Claudin 18.2, which has shown promise as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. First results were presented at the ASCO Plenary Series 2023.

Additionally, a clinical science symposium presentation of the externally sponsored CAPRI Phase II trial will share efficacy and safety results for ceralasertib, an ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) kinase inhibitor, plus LYNPARZA (olaparib) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent high-grade serious ovarian cancer.

Collaboration in the scientific community is critical to improving outcomes for patients. AstraZeneca is collaborating with Daiichi Sankyo Company Limited to develop and commercialize ENHERTU and datopotamab deruxtecan, and with Merck & Co., Inc. (MSD outside of the US and Canada) to develop and commercialize LYNPARZA. AstraZeneca obtained full oncology rights to monalizumab from Innate Pharma in October 2018 through a co-development and commercialization agreement initiated in 2015.

Key AstraZeneca presentations during ASCO 2024

Lead Author

Abstract Title

Presentation details (CDT)

Lung Cancers

Ramalingam, SS

Osimertinib (osi) after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients (pts) with unresectable stage (stg) III epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated (EGFRm) NSCLC: Primary results of the phase 3 LAURA study.

Abstract #LBA4

Plenary Session

June 2, 2024

2:47pm

Spigel, DR

 

ADRIATIC: durvalumab (D) as consolidation treatment (tx) for patients (pts) with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC).

Abstract #LBA5

Plenary Session

June 2, 2024

3:21pm

John, T

Molecular residual disease (MRD) analysis from the ADAURA trial of adjuvant (adj) osimertinib in patients (pts) with resected EGFR‑mutated (EGFRm) stage IB–IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

 

Abstract #8005

Oral Abstract Session

June 3, 2024

9:12am

Heymach, J

Outcomes with perioperative durvalumab (D) in pts with resectable NSCLC and baseline N2 lymph node involvement (N2 R-NSCLC): An exploratory subgroup analysis of AEGEAN.

 

Abstract #8011

Rapid Oral Abstract Session

June 2, 2024

4:36pm

Aggarwal, C

Updated results from COAST, a phase 2 study of durvalumab (D) ± oleclumab (O) or monalizumab (M) in patients (pts) with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (uNSCLC).

 

Abstract #8046

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Levy, BP

Datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) plus pembrolizumab (pembro) with or without platinum chemotherapy (Pt-CT) as first-line (1L) therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (aNSCLC): Subgroup analysis from TROPION-Lung02.

Abstract #8617

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Janne, PA

Trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) in patients with HER2-mutant metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC): Final analysis results of DESTINY-Lung02.

 

Abstract #8543

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Sun, Y

Datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) in Chinese patients (pts) with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Results from the phase 1/2 TROPION-PanTumor02 study.

 

Abstract #8548

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Lisberg, A

Intracranial efficacy of datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) in patients (pts) with previously treated advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (a/m NSCLC) with actionable genomic alterations (AGA): Results from TROPION-Lung05.

Abstract #8593

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Sands, J

Analysis of drug-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) inpatients (pts) treated with datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd).

Abstract #8623

Poster Session

June 3, 2024

1:30pm

Breast Cancers

Curigliano, G

Trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) vs physician’s choice of chemotherapy (TPC) in patients (pts) with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-low or HER2-ultralow metastatic breast cancer (mBC) with prior endocrine therapy (ET): Primary results from DESTINY-Breast06 (DB-06).

 

Abstract #LBA1000

Oral Abstract Session

June 2, 2024

7:30am

Pernas, S

Datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) vs chemotherapy (CT) in previously treated inoperable or metastatic hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative (HR+/HER2–) breast cancer (BC): Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from the TROPION-Breast01 study.

Abstract #1006

Oral Abstract Session

June 1, 2024

4:24pm

Andre, F

DESTINY-Breast07: Dose-expansion interim analysis of T-DXd monotherapy and T-DXd + pertuzumab in patients with previously untreated HER2+ mBC.

 

Abstract #1009

Oral Abstract Session

June 1, 2024

5:24pm

Shatsky, RA

Rates of pathologic complete response (pCR) after datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato) plus durvalumab (Durva) in the neoadjuvant setting: Results from the I-SPY2.2 trial.

Abstract #LBA501

Oral Abstract Session

June 3, 2024

3:12pm

Meisel, J

Rates of pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato): Results from the I-SPY2.2 trial.

Abstract #LBA509

Rapid Oral Abstract Session

May 31, 2024

2:45pm

Hamilton, EP

Trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) vs trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in patients (pts) with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer (mBC): Updated survival results of DESTINY-Breast03.

Abstract #1025

Poster Session

June 2, 2024

9:00am

Gastrointestinal Cancers

Zhang, Q

Phase I study of C-CAR031, a GPC3-specific TGFβRIIDN armored autologous CAR-T, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

 

Abstract #4019

Rapid Oral Abstract Session

June 3, 2024

10:51am

Xu, RH

Updates on Abstract 434420: A Phase 1 Trial of Claudin 18.2-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugate CMG901 in Patients with Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

Education Session

June 1, 2024

12:42pm

Chan, SL

Safety analysis by treatment periods from EMERALD-1: A phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled study of transarterial chemoembolization with durvalumab with/without bevacizumab in participants with embolization-eligible unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

 

Abstract #4122

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

1:30pm

Kelley, RK

T cell receptor and immune gene expression pharmacodynamics for durvalumab monotherapy and in combination with tremelimumab or bevacizumab in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC).

 

Abstract #4022

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

1:30pm

Hamilton, A

ATHENA: A phase 1/2 study of AZD5851, a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy directed against GPC3 in adult patients with advanced/recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

 

Abstract #TPS2675

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

9:00am

Shen, L

GEMINI-Gastric: A phase 2 study of novel treatment combinations in patients with locally advanced unresectable or metastatic gastric cancers.

 

Abstract #TPS4182

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

1:30pm

Zhou, J

GEMINI-Hepatobiliary: A phase 2 study of novel first-line immuno-oncology-based treatments in patients with advanced hepatobiliary cancers.

 

Abstract #TPS4187

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

1:30pm

Gynecological Cancers

Simpkins, F

Combination ATR and PARP Inhibitor (CAPRI): A phase 2 study of ceralasertib plus olaparib in patients with recurrent, platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer (cohort A).

Abstract #5510

Clinical Science Symposium

June 1, 2024

1:39pm

Pan-Tumor

Raufi, AG

CLARITY-PanTumor01: A phase 2 trial of the claudin 18.2-specific antibody-drug conjugate AZD0901 (CMG901) in patients with CLDN18.2-expressing advanced solid tumors.

Abstract #TPS3163

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

9:00am

Punekar, SR

 

An open-label, phase 1, multicenter study to evaluate the safety and preliminary anti-tumor activity of NT‑112 in human leukocyte antigen-C*08:02–positive adult patients with unresectable, advanced, and/or metastatic solid tumors that are positive for the KRAS G12D mutation.

Abstract #TPS2677

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

9:00am

Spira, AI

PRIMROSE: A modular phase 1/2a study of AZD3470, an MTA-cooperative PRMT5 inhibitor, in patients with MTAP deficient advanced solid tumors.

 

Abstract #TPS3179e

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

9:00am

Perez, A

Non-clinical evaluation of NT-175, an autologous T cell product engineered to express an HLA-A*02:01-restricted TCR targeting TP53 R175H and resistant to TGF-b inhibition.

Abstract #2560

Poster Session

June 1, 2024

9:00am

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR TAGRISSO® (osimetinib)

  • There are no contraindications for TAGRISSO
  • Interstitial lung disease (ILD)/pneumonitis occurred in 4% of the 1813 TAGRISSO-treated patients; 0.4% of cases were fatal. In the FLAURA2 study, ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 3.3% of the 276 patients who received TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy; 0.4% of cases were fatal. Withhold TAGRISSO and promptly investigate for ILD in patients who present with worsening of respiratory symptoms which may be indicative of ILD (eg, dyspnea, cough and fever). Permanently discontinue TAGRISSO if ILD/pneumonitis is confirmed
  • Heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation occurs in TAGRISSO-treated patients. Of the 1813 TAGRISSO monotherapy-treated patients in clinical trials, 1.1% were found to have a QTc >500 msec, and 4.3% of patients had an increase from baseline QTc >60 msec. Of the 276 patients treated with TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy in the FLAURA2 study, 1.8% were found to have a QTc >500 msec, and 10.5% of patients had an increase from baseline QTc >60 msec. No QTc-related arrhythmias were reported. Conduct periodic monitoring with ECGs and electrolytes in patients with congenital long QTc syndrome, congestive heart failure, electrolyte abnormalities, or those who are taking medications known to prolong the QTc interval. Permanently discontinue TAGRISSO in patients who develop QTc interval prolongation with signs/symptoms of life-threatening arrhythmia
  • Cardiomyopathy occurred in 3.8% of the 1813 TAGRISSO-treated patients; 0.1% of cardiomyopathy cases were fatal. In the FLAURA2 study, cardiomyopathy occurred in 9% of the 276 patients who received TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy; 1.1% of cardiomyopathy cases were fatal. A decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥10% from baseline and to <50% LVEF occurred in 4.2% of 1557 patients who had baseline and at least one follow-up LVEF assessment. In the ADAURA study, 1.5% (5/325) of TAGRISSO-treated patients experienced LVEF decreases ≥10% from baseline and a drop to <50%. In the FLAURA2 study, 8% (21/262) of patients treated with TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy, who had baseline and at least one follow-up LVEF assessment, experienced LVEF decreases ≥10% and a drop to less than 50%. For patients receiving TAGRISSO monotherapy, conduct cardiac monitoring in patients with cardiac risk factors, including assessment of LVEF at baseline and during treatment. For patients receiving TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy, conduct cardiac monitoring in all patients, including assessment of LVEF at baseline and during treatment. Assess LVEF in patients who develop relevant cardiac signs or symptoms during treatment. For symptomatic congestive heart failure, permanently discontinue TAGRISSO
  • Keratitis was reported in 0.6% of 1813 patients treated with TAGRISSO monotherapy in clinical trials. Promptly refer patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of keratitis (such as eye inflammation, lacrimation, light sensitivity, blurred vision, eye pain and/or red eye) to an ophthalmologist
  • Postmarketing cases consistent with erythema multiforme major (EMM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) have been reported in patients receiving TAGRISSO. Withhold TAGRISSO if EMM, SJS, or TEN is suspected and permanently discontinue if confirmed
  • Postmarketing cases of cutaneous vasculitis including leukocytoclastic vasculitis, urticarial vasculitis, and IgA vasculitis have been reported in patients receiving TAGRISSO. Withhold TAGRISSO if cutaneous vasculitis is suspected, evaluate for systemic involvement, and consider dermatology consultation. If no other etiology can be identified, consider permanent discontinuation of TAGRISSO based on severity
  • Aplastic anemia has been reported in patients treated with TAGRISSO in clinical trials (0.06% of 1813) and postmarketing. Some cases had a fatal outcome. Inform patients of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia including but not limited to, new or persistent fevers, bruising, bleeding, and pallor. If aplastic anemia is suspected, withhold TAGRISSO and obtain a hematology consultation. If aplastic anemia is confirmed, permanently discontinue TAGRISSO. Perform complete blood count with differential before starting TAGRISSO, periodically throughout treatment, and more frequently if indicated
  • Verify pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating TAGRISSO. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TAGRISSO and for 6 weeks after the final dose. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception for 4 months after the final dose
  • Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from TAGRISSO, women should not breastfeed during treatment with TAGRISSO and for 2 weeks after the final dose
  • Most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were:
    • TAGRISSO monotherapy: leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, diarrhea, rash, musculoskeletal pain, neutropenia, nail toxicity, dry skin, stomatitis, and fatigue
    • TAGRISSO in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, rash, diarrhea, stomatitis, nail toxicity, dry skin, and increased blood creatinine

INDICATIONS

  • TAGRISSO is indicated as adjuvant therapy after tumor resection in adult patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 L858R mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test
  • TAGRISSO is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 L858R mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test
  • TAGRISSO is indicated in combination with pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy, for the first-line treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 L858R mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test
  • TAGRISSO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) T790M mutation-positive NSCLC, as detected by an FDA-approved test, whose disease has progressed on or after EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Patient Information for TAGRISSO.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR IMFINZI® (durvalumab)

There are no contraindications for IMFINZI® (durvalumab) or IMJUDO® (tremelimumab-actl).

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions
Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed under Warnings and Precautions may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated reactions. Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. Immune-mediated adverse reactions can occur at any time after starting treatment or after discontinuation. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and before each dose. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate. Withhold or permanently discontinue IMFINZI and IMJUDO depending on severity. See USPI Dosing and Administration for specific details. In general, if IMFINZI and IMJUDO requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 mg to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis
IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis, which may be fatal. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • In patients who did not receive recent prior radiation, the incidence of immune-mediated pneumonitis was 2.4% (34/1414), including fatal (<0.1%), and Grade 3-4 (0.4%) adverse reactions. In patients who received recent prior radiation, the incidence of pneumonitis (including radiation pneumonitis) in patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC following definitive chemoradiation within 42 days prior to initiation of IMFINZI in PACIFIC was 18.3% (87/475) in patients receiving IMFINZI and 12.8% (30/234) in patients receiving placebo. Of the patients who received IMFINZI (475), 1.1% were fatal and 2.7% were Grade 3 adverse reactions.
    • The frequency and severity of immune-mediated pneumonitis in patients who did not receive definitive chemoradiation prior to IMFINZI were similar in patients who received IMFINZI as a single agent or with ES-SCLC or BTC when given in combination with chemotherapy.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune‑mediated pneumonitis occurred in 1.3% (5/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including fatal (0.3%) and Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.5% (21/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including fatal (0.5%), and Grade 3 (1%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Colitis
IMFINZI with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal.

IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated colitis that is frequently associated with diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2% (37/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 4 (<0.1%) and Grade 3 (0.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune‑mediated colitis or diarrhea occurred in 6% (23/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (3.6%) adverse reactions. Intestinal perforation has been observed in other studies of IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 6.5% (39/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy including fatal (0.2%) and Grade 3 (2.5%) adverse reactions. Intestinal perforation and large intestine perforation were reported in 0.1% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis
IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated hepatitis, which may be fatal.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 2.8% (52/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including fatal (0.2%), Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune‑mediated hepatitis occurred in 7.5% (29/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including fatal (0.8%), Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (4.1%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 3.9% (23/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including fatal (0.3%), Grade 4 (0.5%), and Grade 3 (2%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

  • Adrenal Insufficiency: IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.5% (9/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1.5% (6/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated adrenal insufficiency occurred in 2.2% (13/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.8%) adverse reactions.
  • Hypophysitis: IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field cuts. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate symptomatic treatment including hormone replacement as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Grade 3 hypophysitis/hypopituitarism occurred in <0.1% (1/1889) of patients who received IMFINZI.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Immune-mediated hypophysitis/hypopituitarism occurred in 1% (4/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated hypophysitis occurred in 1.3% (8/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • Thyroid Disorders (Thyroiditis, Hyperthyroidism, and Hypothyroidism): IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement therapy for hypothyroidism or institute medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 0.5% (9/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
      • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.1% (39/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI.
      • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 8.3% (156/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 1.5% (6/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
      • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 4.6% (18/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
      • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 11% (42/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated thyroiditis occurred in 1.2% (7/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy.
      • Immune-mediated hyperthyroidism occurred in 5% (30/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.
      • Immune-mediated hypothyroidism occurred in 8.6% (51/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis: Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.
    • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
      • Grade 3 immune-mediated Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in <0.1% (1/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
      • Two patients (0.5%, 2/388) had events of hyperglycemia requiring insulin therapy that had not resolved at last follow-up.
    • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
      • Immune-mediated Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in 0.5% (3/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction
IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated nephritis.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.5% (10/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 1% (4/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 3 (0.5%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.7% (4/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Dermatology Reactions
IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), has occurred with PD-1/L-1 and CTLA-4 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 1.8% (34/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (0.4%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 4.9% (19/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.5%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Immune-mediated rash or dermatitis occurred in 7.2% (43/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Immune-Mediated Pancreatitis
IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO can cause immune-mediated pancreatitis. Immune-mediated pancreatitis occurred in 2.3% (9/388) of patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including Grade 4 (0.3%) and Grade 3 (1.5%) adverse reactions.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions
The following clinically significant, immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of less than 1% each in patients who received IMFINZI and IMJUDO or were reported with the use of other immune-checkpoint inhibitors.

  • Cardiac/vascular: Myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis.
  • Nervous system: Meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy.
  • Ocular: Uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment to include blindness can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.
  • Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis including increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis.
  • Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: Myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatic.
  • Endocrine: Hypoparathyroidism.
  • Other (hematologic/immune): Hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenia, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions
IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions. Monitor for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt, slow the rate of, or permanently discontinue IMFINZI and IMJUDO based on the severity. See USPI Dosing and Administration for specific details. For Grade 1 or 2 infusion-related reactions, consider using pre-medications with subsequent doses.

  • IMFINZI as a Single Agent
    • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (42/1889) of patients receiving IMFINZI, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO
    • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 10 (2.6%) patients receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO.
  • IMFINZI with IMJUDO and Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
    • Infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.9% (17/596) of patients receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, including Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reactions.

Complications of Allogeneic HSCT after IMFINZI
Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/L-1 blocking antibody. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/L-1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT. Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/L-1 blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
Based on their mechanism of action and data from animal studies, IMFINZI and IMJUDO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. In females of reproductive potential, verify pregnancy status prior to initiating IMFINZI and IMJUDO and advise them to use effective contraception during treatment with IMFINZI and IMJUDO and for 3 months after the last dose of IMFINZI and IMJUDO.

Lactation
There is no information regarding the presence of IMFINZI and IMJUDO in human milk; however, because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from IMFINZI and IMJUDO, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

  • In patients with Stage III NSCLC in the PACIFIC study receiving IMFINZI (n=475), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were cough (40%), fatigue (34%), pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis (34%), upper respiratory tract infections (26%), dyspnea (25%), and rash (23%). The most common Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (≥3%) were pneumonia (7%) and pneumonitis/radiation pneumonitis (3.4%).
  • In patients with Stage III NSCLC in the PACIFIC study receiving IMFINZI (n=475), discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred in 15% of patients in the IMFINZI arm. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 29% of patients receiving IMFINZI. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥2%) were pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis (7%) and pneumonia (6%). Fatal pneumonitis or radiation pneumonitis and fatal pneumonia occurred in <2% of patients and were similar across arms.
  • In patients with mNSCLC in the POSEIDON study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO plus platinum-based chemotherapy (n=330), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were nausea (42%), fatigue (36%), musculoskeletal pain (29%), decreased appetite (28%), rash (27%), and diarrhea (22%).
  • In patients with mNSCLC in the POSEIDON study receiving IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy (n=330), permanent discontinuation of IMFINZI or IMJUDO due to an adverse reaction occurred in 17% of patients. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients, with the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients being pneumonia (11%), anemia (5%), diarrhea (2.4%), thrombocytopenia (2.4%), pyrexia (2.4%), and febrile neutropenia (2.1%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in a total of 4.2% of patients.
  • In patients with extensive-stage SCLC in the CASPIAN study receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy (n=265), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were nausea (34%), fatigue/asthenia (32%), and alopecia (31%). The most common Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction (≥3%) was fatigue/asthenia (3.4%).
  • In patients with extensive-stage SCLC in the CASPIAN study receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy (n=265), IMFINZI was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 7% of the patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 31% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 1% of patients were febrile neutropenia (4.5%), pneumonia (2.3%), anemia (1.9%), pancytopenia (1.5%), pneumonitis (1.1%), and COPD (1.1%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4.9% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy.
  • In patients with locally advanced or metastatic BTC in the TOPAZ-1 study receiving IMFINZI (n=338), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were fatigue (42%), nausea (40%), constipation (32%), decreased appetite (26%), abdominal pain (24%), rash (23%), and pyrexia (20%).
  • In patients with locally advanced or metastatic BTC in the TOPAZ-1 study receiving IMFINZI (n=338), discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred in 6% of the patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients were cholangitis (7%), pyrexia (3.8%), anemia (3.6%), sepsis (3.3%) and acute kidney injury (2.4%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3.6% of patients receiving IMFINZI plus chemotherapy. These include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (4 patients), sepsis (2 patients), and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (2 patients).
  • In patients with unresectable HCC in the HIMALAYA study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO (n=388), the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were rash (32%), diarrhea (27%), fatigue (26%), pruritus (23%), musculoskeletal pain (22%), and abdominal pain (20%).
  • In patients with unresectable HCC in the HIMALAYA study receiving IMFINZI and IMJUDO (n=388), serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients included hemorrhage (6%), diarrhea (4%), sepsis (2.1%), pneumonia (2.1%), rash (1.5%), vomiting (1.3%), acute kidney injury (1.3%), and anemia (1.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 8% of patients who received IMFINZI and IMJUDO, including death (1%), hemorrhage intracranial (0.5%), cardiac arrest (0.5%), pneumonitis (0.5%), hepatic failure (0.5%), and immune-mediated hepatitis (0.5%). Permanent discontinuation of treatment regimen due to an adverse reaction occurred in 14% of patients.

The safety and effectiveness of IMFINZI and IMJUDO have not been established in pediatric patients.

Indications:

IMFINZI is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has not progressed following concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

IMFINZI, in combination with IMJUDO and platinum-based chemotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic NSCLC with no sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations.

IMFINZI, in combination with etoposide and either carboplatin or cisplatin, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC).

IMFINZI, in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC).

IMFINZI in combination with IMJUDO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC).

Please see Full Prescribing Information including Medication Guide for IMFINZI and IMJUDO.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR LYNPARZA® (olaparib)

CONTRAINDICATIONS

There are no contraindications for LYNPARZA.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Myelodysplastic Syndrome/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (MDS/AML): Occurred in approximately 1.2% of patients with various BRCAm, gBRCAm, HRR gene-mutated or HRD-positive cancers who received LYNPARZA as a single agent or as part of a combination regimen, consistent with the approved indications, and the majority of events had a fatal outcome. The median duration of therapy in patients who developed MDS/AML was approximately 2 years (range: <6 months to >4 years). All of these patients had previous chemotherapy with platinum agents and/or other DNA-damaging agents, including radiotherapy.

In SOLO-1, patients with newly diagnosed advanced BRCAm ovarian cancer, the incidence of MDS/AML was 1.9% (5/260) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 0.8% (1/130) in patients who received placebo based on an updated analysis. In PAOLA-1, of patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer with HRD-positive status, the incidence of MDS/AML was 1.6% (4/255) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 2.3% (3/131) in the control arm.

In SOLO-2, patients with BRCAm platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer, the incidence of MDS/AML was 8% (15/195) in patients who received LYNPARZA and 4% (4/99) in patients who received placebo. The duration of LYNPARZA treatment prior to the diagnosis of MDS/AML ranged from 0.6 years to 4.5 years.

Do not start LYNPARZA until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (≤Grade 1). Monitor complete blood count for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment. For prolonged hematological toxicities, interrupt LYNPARZA and monitor blood count weekly until recovery.

If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample for cytogenetics. Discontinue LYNPARZA if MDS/AML is confirmed.

Pneumonitis: Occurred in 0.8% of patients exposed to LYNPARZA monotherapy, and some cases were fatal. If patients present with new or worsening respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and fever, or a radiological abnormality occurs, interrupt LYNPARZA treatment and initiate prompt investigation. Discontinue LYNPARZA if pneumonitis is confirmed and treat patient appropriately.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): Including severe or fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) occurred in patients treated with LYNPARZA. In the combined data of two randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies (PROfound and PROpel) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (N=1180), VTE occurred in 8% of patients who received LYNPARZA, including pulmonary embolism in 6%. In the control arms, VTE occurred in 2.5%, including pulmonary embolism in 1.5%. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and treat as medically appropriate, which may include long-term anticoagulation as clinically indicated.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, LYNPARZA can cause fetal harm. Verify pregnancy status in females of reproductive potential prior to initiating treatment.

Females
Advise females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus and to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose.

Males
Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential or who are pregnant to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months following the last dose of LYNPARZA and to not donate sperm during this time.

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance BRCAm Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for SOLO-1 were: nausea (77%), fatigue (67%), abdominal pain (45%), vomiting (40%), anemia (38%), diarrhea (37%), constipation (28%), upper respiratory tract infection/influenza/nasopharyngitis/bronchitis (28%), dysgeusia (26%), decreased appetite (20%), dizziness (20%), neutropenia (17%), dyspepsia (17%), dyspnea (15%), leukopenia (13%), urinary tract infection (13%), thrombocytopenia (11%), and stomatitis (11%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for SOLO-1 were: decrease in hemoglobin (87%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (87%), decrease in leukocytes (70%), decrease in lymphocytes (67%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (51%), decrease in platelets (35%), and increase in serum creatinine (34%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Combination with Bevacizumab

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients treated with LYNPARZA/bevacizumab and at a ≥5% frequency compared to placebo/bevacizumab in the first-line maintenance setting for PAOLA-1 were: nausea (53%), fatigue (including asthenia) (53%), anemia (41%), lymphopenia (24%), vomiting (22%), and leukopenia (18%). In addition, the most common adverse reactions (≥10%) for patients receiving LYNPARZA/bevacizumab irrespective of the frequency compared with the placebo/bevacizumab arm were: diarrhea (18%), neutropenia (18%), urinary tract infection (15%), and headache (14%).

In addition, venous thromboembolism occurred more commonly in patients receiving LYNPARZA/bevacizumab (5%) than in those receiving placebo/bevacizumab (1.9%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients for LYNPARZA in combination with bevacizumab in the first-line maintenance setting for PAOLA-1 were: decrease in hemoglobin (79%), decrease in lymphocytes (63%), increase in serum creatinine (61%), decrease in leukocytes (59%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (35%), and decrease in platelets (35%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Maintenance gBRCAm Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the maintenance setting for SOLO-2 were: nausea (76%), fatigue (including asthenia) (66%), anemia (44%), vomiting (37%), nasopharyngitis/upper respiratory tract infection (URI)/influenza (36%), diarrhea (33%), arthralgia/myalgia (30%), dysgeusia (27%), headache (26%), decreased appetite (22%), and stomatitis (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the maintenance setting for SOLO-2 were: increase in mean corpuscular volume (89%), decrease in hemoglobin (83%), decrease in leukocytes (69%), decrease in lymphocytes (67%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (51%), increase in serum creatinine (44%), and decrease in platelets (42%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Adjuvant Treatment of gBRCAm, HER2-Negative, High-Risk Early Breast Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: nausea (57%), fatigue (including asthenia) (42%), anemia (24%), vomiting (23%), headache (20%), diarrhea (18%), leukopenia (17%), neutropenia (16%), decreased appetite (13%), dysgeusia (12%), dizziness (11%), and stomatitis (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: decrease in lymphocytes (77%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (67%), decrease in hemoglobin (65%), decrease in leukocytes (64%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (39%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—gBRCAm, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the metastatic setting for OlympiAD were: nausea (58%), anemia (40%), fatigue (including asthenia) (37%), vomiting (30%), neutropenia (27%), respiratory tract infection (27%), leukopenia (25%), diarrhea (21%), and headache (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the metastatic setting for OlympiAD were: decrease in hemoglobin (82%), decrease in lymphocytes (73%), decrease in leukocytes (71%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (71%), decrease in absolute neutrophil count (46%), and decrease in platelets (33%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—First-Line Maintenance gBRCAm Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for POLO were: fatigue (60%), nausea (45%), abdominal pain (34%), diarrhea (29%), anemia (27%), decreased appetite (25%), constipation (23%), vomiting (20%), back pain (19%), arthralgia (15%), rash (15%), thrombocytopenia (14%), dyspnea (13%), neutropenia (12%), nasopharyngitis (12%), dysgeusia (11%), and stomatitis (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the first-line maintenance setting for POLO were: increase in serum creatinine (99%), decrease in hemoglobin (86%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (71%), decrease in lymphocytes (61%), decrease in platelets (56%), decrease in leukocytes (50%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (25%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—HRR Gene-mutated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA for PROfound were: anemia (46%), fatigue (including asthenia) (41%), nausea (41%), decreased appetite (30%), diarrhea (21%), vomiting (18%), thrombocytopenia (12%), cough (11%), and dyspnea (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA for PROfound were: decrease in hemoglobin (98%), decrease in lymphocytes (62%), decrease in leukocytes (53%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (34%).

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Combination with Abiraterone and Prednisone or Prednisolone

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA/abiraterone with a difference of ≥5% compared to placebo for PROpel were: anemia (48%), fatigue (including asthenia) (38%), nausea (30%), diarrhea (19%), decreased appetite (16%), lymphopenia (14%), dizziness (14%), and abdominal pain (13%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥20% of patients who received LYNPARZA/abiraterone for PROpel were: decrease in hemoglobin (97%), decrease in lymphocytes (70%), decrease in platelets (23%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (23%).

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Anticancer Agents: Clinical studies of LYNPARZA with other myelosuppressive anticancer agents, including DNA-damaging agents, indicate a potentiation and prolongation of myelosuppressive toxicity.

CYP3A Inhibitors: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors when using LYNPARZA. If a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor must be coadministered, reduce the dose of LYNPARZA. Advise patients to avoid grapefruit, grapefruit juice, Seville oranges, and Seville orange juice during LYNPARZA treatment.

CYP3A Inducers: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers when using LYNPARZA.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Lactation: No data are available regarding the presence of olaparib in human milk, its effects on the breastfed infant or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed infant, advise a lactating woman not to breastfeed during treatment with LYNPARZA and for 1 month after receiving the final dose.

Pediatric Use: The safety and efficacy of LYNPARZA have not been established in pediatric patients.

Hepatic Impairment: No adjustment to the starting dose is required in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification A and B). There are no data in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification C).

Renal Impairment: No dosage modification is recommended in patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr 51-80 mL/min estimated by Cockcroft-Gault). In patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr 31-50 mL/min), reduce the dose of LYNPARZA to 200 mg twice daily. There are no data in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (CLcr ≤30 mL/min).

INDICATIONS

LYNPARZA is a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor indicated:

First-Line Maintenance BRCAm Advanced Ovarian Cancer
For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm or sBRCAm) advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

First-Line Maintenance HRD-Positive Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Combination with Bevacizumab
In combination with bevacizumab for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who are in complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy and whose cancer is associated with homologous recombination deficiency (HRD)-positive status defined by either:

  • a deleterious or suspected deleterious BRCA mutation, and/or
  • genomic instability

Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Maintenance BRCA-mutated Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm or sBRCAm) recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Adjuvant Treatment of gBRCAm, HER2-Negative, High-Risk Early Breast Cancer
For the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, high-risk early breast cancer who have been treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

gBRCAm, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer
For the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative metastatic breast cancer who have been treated with chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or metastatic setting. Patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer should have been treated with a prior endocrine therapy or be considered inappropriate for endocrine therapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

First-Line Maintenance gBRCAm Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer
For the maintenance treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma whose disease has not progressed on at least 16 weeks of a first-line platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

HRR Gene-mutated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
For the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic homologous recombination repair (HRR) gene-mutated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who have progressed following prior treatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

BRCAm Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Combination with Abiraterone and Prednisone or Prednisolone
In combination with abiraterone and prednisone or prednisolone (abi/pred) for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious BRCA-mutated (BRCAm) metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki)

Indications
ENHERTU is a HER2-directed antibody and topoisomerase inhibitor conjugate indicated for the treatment of adult patients with:

  • Unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive (IHC 3+ or ISH positive) breast cancer who have received a prior anti-HER2-based regimen either:

– In the metastatic setting, or

– In the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting and have developed disease recurrence during or within six months of completing therapy

  • Unresectable or metastatic HER2-low (IHC 1+ or IHC 2+/ISH-) breast cancer, as determined by an FDA-approved test, who have received a prior chemotherapy in the metastatic setting or developed disease recurrence during or within 6 months of completing adjuvant chemotherapy
  • Unresectable or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have activating HER2 (ERBB2) mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test, and who have received a prior systemic therapy

    This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on objective response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.
  • Locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive (IHC 3+ or IHC 2+/ISH positive) gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma who have received a prior trastuzumab-based regimen
  • Unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive (IHC3+) solid tumors who have received prior systemic treatment and have no satisfactory alternative treatment options

    This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on objective response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

WARNING: INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE and EMBRYO-FETAL TOXICITY

  • Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pneumonitis, including fatal cases, have been reported with ENHERTU. Monitor for and promptly investigate signs and symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fever, and other new or worsening respiratory symptoms. Permanently discontinue ENHERTU in all patients with Grade 2 or higher ILD/pneumonitis. Advise patients of the risk and to immediately report symptoms.
  • Exposure to ENHERTU during pregnancy can cause embryo-fetal harm. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception.

Contraindications
None.

Warnings and Precautions
Interstitial Lung Disease / Pneumonitis
Severe, life-threatening, or fatal interstitial lung disease (ILD), including pneumonitis, can occur in patients treated with ENHERTU. A higher incidence of Grade 1 and 2 ILD/pneumonitis has been observed in patients with moderate renal impairment. Advise patients to immediately report cough, dyspnea, fever, and/or any new or worsening respiratory symptoms. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of ILD. Promptly investigate evidence of ILD. Evaluate patients with suspected ILD by radiographic imaging. Consider consultation with a pulmonologist. For asymptomatic ILD/pneumonitis (Grade 1), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 0, then if resolved in ≤28 days from date of onset, maintain dose. If resolved in >28 days from date of onset, reduce dose one level. Consider corticosteroid treatment as soon as ILD/pneumonitis is suspected (e.g., ≥0.5 mg/kg/day prednisolone or equivalent). For symptomatic ILD/pneumonitis (Grade 2 or greater), permanently discontinue ENHERTU. Promptly initiate systemic corticosteroid treatment as soon as ILD/pneumonitis is suspected (e.g., ≥1 mg/kg/day prednisolone or equivalent) and continue for at least 14 days followed by gradual taper for at least 4 weeks.

HER2-Positive or HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer, HER2-Mutant NSCLC, and Solid Tumors (Including IHC 3+) (5.4 mg/kg)
In patients with metastatic breast cancer, HER2-mutant NSCLC, and other solid tumors treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, ILD occurred in 12% of patients. Median time to first onset was 5.5 months (range: 0.9 to 31.5). Fatal outcomes due to ILD and/or pneumonitis occurred in 1.0% of patients treated with ENHERTU.

HER2-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)
In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, ILD occurred in 10% of patients. Median time to first onset was 2.8 months (range: 1.2 to 21).

Neutropenia
Severe neutropenia, including febrile neutropenia, can occur in patients treated with ENHERTU. Monitor complete blood counts prior to initiation of ENHERTU and prior to each dose, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 neutropenia (Absolute Neutrophil Count [ANC] <1.0 to 0.5 x 109/L), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 2 or less, then maintain dose. For Grade 4 neutropenia (ANC <0.5 x 109/L), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 2 or less, then reduce dose by one level. For febrile neutropenia (ANC <1.0 x 109/L and temperature >38.3º C or a sustained temperature of ≥38º C for more than 1 hour), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved, then reduce dose by one level.

HER2-Positive or HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer, HER2-Mutant NSCLC, and Solid Tumors (Including IHC 3+) (5.4 mg/kg)
In patients with metastatic breast cancer, HER2-mutant NSCLC, and other solid tumors treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, a decrease in neutrophil count was reported in 63% of patients. Seventeen percent had Grade 3 or 4 decreased neutrophil count. Median time to first onset of decreased neutrophil count was 22 days (range: 2 to 939). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1% of patients.

HER2-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)
In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, a decrease in neutrophil count was reported in 72% of patients. Fifty-one percent had Grade 3 or 4 decreased neutrophil count. Median time to first onset of decreased neutrophil count was 16 days (range: 4 to 187). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 4.8% of patients.

Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Patients treated with ENHERTU may be at increased risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decrease has been observed with anti-HER2 therapies, including ENHERTU. Assess LVEF prior to initiation of ENHERTU and at regular intervals during treatment as clinically indicated. Manage LVEF decrease through treatment interruption. When LVEF is >45% and absolute decrease from baseline is 10-20%, continue treatment with ENHERTU. When LVEF is 40-45% and absolute decrease from baseline is <10%, continue treatment with ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. When LVEF is 40-45% and absolute decrease from baseline is 10-20%, interrupt ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. If LVEF has not recovered to within 10% from baseline, permanently discontinue ENHERTU. If LVEF recovers to within 10% from baseline, resume treatment with ENHERTU at the same dose. When LVEF is <40% or absolute decrease from baseline is >20%, interrupt ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. If LVEF of <40% or absolute decrease from baseline of >20% is confirmed, permanently discontinue ENHERTU. Permanently discontinue ENHERTU in patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure. Treatment with ENHERTU has not been studied in patients with a history of clinically significant cardiac disease or LVEF <50% prior to initiation of treatment.

HER2-Positive or HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer, HER2-Mutant NSCLC, and Solid Tumors (Including IHC 3+) (5.4 mg/kg)
In patients with metastatic breast cancer, HER2-mutant NSCLC, and other solid tumors treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, LVEF decrease was reported in 3.8% of patients, of which 0.6% were Grade 3.

HER2-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)
In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, no clinical adverse events of heart failure were reported; however, on echocardiography, 8% were found to have asymptomatic Grade 2 decrease in LVEF.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risks to a fetus. Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to the initiation of ENHERTU. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 7 months after the last dose of ENHERTU. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 4 months after the last dose of ENHERTU.

Additional Dose Modifications
Thrombocytopenia
For Grade 3 thrombocytopenia (platelets <50 to 25 x 109/L) interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 1 or less, then maintain dose. For Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (platelets <25 x 109/L) interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 1 or less, then reduce dose by one level.

Adverse Reactions
HER2-Positive and HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer, HER2-Mutant NSCLC, and Solid Tumors (Including IHC 3+) (5.4 mg/kg)
The pooled safety population reflects exposure to ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks in 1799 patients in Study DS8201-A-J101 (NCT02564900), DESTINY-Breast01, DESTINY-Breast02, DESTINY-Breast03, DESTINY-Breast04, DESTINY-Lung01, DESTINY-Lung02, DESTINY-CRC02, and DESTINY-PanTumor02. Among these patients, 65% were exposed for >6 months and 38% were exposed for >1 year. In this pooled safety population, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (73%), decreased white blood cell count (70%), decreased hemoglobin (66%), decreased neutrophil count (63%), decreased lymphocyte count (58%), fatigue (56%), decreased platelet count (48%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (47%), increased alanine aminotransferase (43%), vomiting (40%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (38%), alopecia (34%), constipation (33%), decreased appetite (32%), decreased blood potassium (31%), diarrhea (29%), musculoskeletal pain (24%), and abdominal pain (20%).

HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer
DESTINY-Breast03
The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 257 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer who received at least one dose of ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously once every three weeks in DESTINY-Breast03. The median duration of treatment was 14 months (range: 0.7 to 30).

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 19% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were vomiting, interstitial lung disease, pneumonia, pyrexia, and urinary tract infection. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 0.8% of patients including COVID-19 and sudden death (one patient each).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 14% of patients, of which ILD/pneumonitis accounted for 8%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, pneumonia, nausea, fatigue, and ILD/pneumonitis. Dose reductions occurred in 21% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were nausea, neutropenia, and fatigue.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (76%), decreased white blood cell count (74%), decreased neutrophil count (70%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (67%), decreased hemoglobin (64%), decreased lymphocyte count (55%), increased alanine aminotransferase (53%), decreased platelet count (52%), fatigue (49%), vomiting (49%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (49%), alopecia (37%), decreased blood potassium (35%), constipation (34%), musculoskeletal pain (31%), diarrhea (29%), decreased appetite (29%), headache (22%), respiratory infection (22%), abdominal pain (21%), increased blood bilirubin (20%), and stomatitis (20%).

HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer
DESTINY-Breast04
The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 371 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-low (IHC 1+ or IHC 2+/ISH-) breast cancer who received ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks in DESTINY-Breast04. The median duration of treatment was 8 months (range: 0.2 to 33) for patients who received ENHERTU.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 28% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, pneumonia, dyspnea, musculoskeletal pain, sepsis, anemia, febrile neutropenia, hypercalcemia, nausea, pyrexia, and vomiting. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 4% of patients including ILD/pneumonitis (3 patients); sepsis (2 patients); and ischemic colitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, dyspnea, febrile neutropenia, general physical health deterioration, pleural effusion, and respiratory failure (1 patient each).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 16% of patients, of which ILD/pneumonitis accounted for 8%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 39% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, fatigue, anemia, leukopenia, COVID-19, ILD/pneumonitis, increased transaminases, and hyperbilirubinemia. Dose reductions occurred in 23% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were fatigue, nausea, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (76%), decreased white blood cell count (70%), decreased hemoglobin (64%), decreased neutrophil count (64%), decreased lymphocyte count (55%), fatigue (54%), decreased platelet count (44%), alopecia (40%), vomiting (40%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (38%), increased alanine aminotransferase (36%), constipation (34%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (34%), decreased appetite (32%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), diarrhea (27%), and decreased blood potassium (25%).

HER2-Mutant Unresectable or Metastatic NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)
DESTINY-Lung02 evaluated two dose levels (5.4 mg/kg [n=101] and 6.4 mg/kg [n=50]); however, only the results for the recommended dose of 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks are described below due to increased toxicity observed with the higher dose in patients with NSCLC, including ILD/pneumonitis.

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 101 patients with HER2-mutant unresectable or metastatic NSCLC who received ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously once every three weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity in DESTINY‑Lung02. Nineteen percent of patients were exposed for >6 months.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, thrombocytopenia, dyspnea, nausea, pleural effusion, and increased troponin I. Fatality occurred in 1 patient with suspected ILD/pneumonitis (1%).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 8% of patients. Adverse reactions which resulted in permanent discontinuation of ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, diarrhea, decreased blood potassium, hypomagnesemia, myocarditis, and vomiting. Dose interruptions of ENHERTU due to adverse reactions occurred in 23% of patients. Adverse reactions which required dose interruption (>2%) included neutropenia and ILD/pneumonitis. Dose reductions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 11% of patients.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (61%), decreased white blood cell count (60%), decreased hemoglobin (58%), decreased neutrophil count (52%), decreased lymphocyte count (43%), decreased platelet count (40%), decreased albumin (39%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (35%), increased alanine aminotransferase (34%), fatigue (32%), constipation (31%), decreased appetite (30%), vomiting (26%), increased alkaline phosphatase (22%), and alopecia (21%).

HER2-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)
The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 187 patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma in DESTINY-Gastric01. Patients intravenously received at least one dose of either ENHERTU (N=125) 6.4 mg/kg every 3 weeks or either irinotecan (N=55) 150 mg/m2 biweekly or paclitaxel (N=7) 80 mg/m2 weekly for 3 weeks. The median duration of treatment was 4.6 months (range: 0.7 to 22.3) for patients who received ENHERTU.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients receiving ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg. Serious adverse reactions in >2% of patients who received ENHERTU were decreased appetite, ILD, anemia, dehydration, pneumonia, cholestatic jaundice, pyrexia, and tumor hemorrhage. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 2.4% of patients: disseminated intravascular coagulation, large intestine perforation, and pneumonia occurred in one patient each (0.8%).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 15% of patients, of which ILD accounted for 6%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 62% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, anemia, decreased appetite, leukopenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, ILD, pneumonia, lymphopenia, upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, and decreased blood potassium. Dose reductions occurred in 32% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were neutropenia, decreased appetite, fatigue, nausea, and febrile neutropenia.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were decreased hemoglobin (75%), decreased white blood cell count (74%), decreased neutrophil count (72%), decreased lymphocyte count (70%), decreased platelet count (68%), nausea (63%), decreased appetite (60%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (58%), fatigue (55%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (54%), increased alanine aminotransferase (47%), diarrhea (32%), decreased blood potassium (30%), vomiting (26%), constipation (24%), increased blood bilirubin (24%), pyrexia (24%), and alopecia (22%).

HER2-Positive (IHC3+) Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors
The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 347 adult patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive (IHC3+) solid tumors who received ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks in DESTINY-Breast01, DESTINY-PanTumor02, DESTINY-Lung01, and DESTINY-CRC02. The median duration of treatment was 8.3 months (range 0.7 to 30.2).

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 34% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were sepsis, pneumonia, vomiting, urinary tract infection, abdominal pain, nausea, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, hemorrhage, COVID-19, fatigue, acute kidney injury, anemia, cellulitis, and dyspnea. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 6.3% of patients including ILD/pneumonitis (2.3%), cardiac arrest (0.6%), COVID-19 (0.6%), and sepsis (0.6%). The following events occurred in one patient each (0.3%): acute kidney injury, cerebrovascular accident, general physical health deterioration, pneumonia, and hemorrhagic shock.

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 15% of patients, of which ILD/pneumonitis accounted for 10%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were decreased neutrophil count, anemia, COVID-19, fatigue, decreased white blood cell count, and ILD/pneumonitis. Dose reductions occurred in 27% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were fatigue, nausea, decreased neutrophil count, ILD/pneumonitis, and diarrhea.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were decreased white blood cell count (75%), nausea (69%), decreased hemoglobin (67%), decreased neutrophil count (66%), fatigue (59%), decreased lymphocyte count (58%), decreased platelet count (51%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (45%), increased alanine aminotransferase (44%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (36%), vomiting (35%), decreased appetite (34%), alopecia (34%), diarrhea (31%), decreased blood potassium (29%), constipation (28%), decreased sodium (22%), stomatitis (20%), and upper respiratory tract infection (20%).

Use in Specific Populations

  • Pregnancy: ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risks to a fetus. There are clinical considerations if ENHERTU is used in pregnant women, or if a patient becomes pregnant within 7 months after the last dose of ENHERTU.
  • Lactation: There are no data regarding the presence of ENHERTU in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with ENHERTU and for 7 months after the last dose.
  • Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: Pregnancy testing: Verify pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiation of ENHERTU. Contraception: Females: ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 7 months after the last dose. Males: Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 4 months after the last dose. Infertility: ENHERTU may impair male reproductive function and fertility.
  • Pediatric Use: Safety and effectiveness of ENHERTU have not been established in pediatric patients.
  • Geriatric Use: Of the 1287 patients with HER2-positive or HER2-low breast cancer treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, 22% were ≥65 years and 3.8% were ≥75 years. No overall differences in efficacy within clinical studies were observed between patients ≥65 years of age compared to younger patients. There was a higher incidence of Grade 3-4 adverse reactions observed in patients aged ≥65 years (59%) as compared to younger patients (49%). Of the 101 patients with HER2-mutant unresectable or metastatic NSCLC treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, 40% were ≥65 years and 8% were ≥75 years. No overall differences in efficacy or safety were observed between patients ≥65 years of age compared to younger patients. Of the 125 patients with HER2-positive locally advanced or metastatic gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg in DESTINY-Gastric01, 56% were ≥65 years and 14% were ≥75 years. No overall differences in efficacy or safety were observed between patients ≥65 years of age compared to younger patients. Of the 192 patients with HER2-positive (IHC 3+) unresectable or metastatic solid tumors treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg in DESTINY-PanTumor02, DESTINY-Lung01, or DESTINY-CRC02, 39% were 65 years or older and 9% were 75 years or older. No overall differences in efficacy or safety were observed between patients ≥65 years of age compared to younger patients.
  • Renal Impairment: A higher incidence of Grade 1 and 2 ILD/pneumonitis has been observed in patients with moderate renal impairment. Monitor patients with moderate renal impairment more frequently. The recommended dosage of ENHERTU has not been established for patients with severe renal impairment (CLcr <30 mL/min).
  • Hepatic Impairment: In patients with moderate hepatic impairment, due to potentially increased exposure, closely monitor for increased toxicities related to the topoisomerase inhibitor, DXd. The recommended dosage of ENHERTU has not been established for patients with severe hepatic impairment (total bilirubin >3 times ULN and any AST).

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Daiichi Sankyo, Inc. at 1-877-437-7763 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide.

Notes

AstraZeneca in oncology
AstraZeneca is leading a revolution in oncology with the ambition to provide cures for cancer in every form, following the science to understand cancer and all its complexities to discover, develop and deliver life-changing medicines to patients.

The Company’s focus is on some of the most challenging cancers. It is through persistent innovation that AstraZeneca has built one of the most diverse portfolios and pipelines in the industry, with the potential to catalyze changes in the practice of medicine and transform the patient experience.

AstraZeneca has the vision to redefine cancer care and, one day, eliminate cancer as a cause of death.

About AstraZeneca
AstraZeneca is a global, science-led biopharmaceutical company that focuses on the discovery, development and commercialization of prescription medicines in Oncology, Rare Diseases and BioPharmaceuticals, including Cardiovascular, Renal & Metabolism, and Respiratory & Immunology. Based in Cambridge, UK, AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries, and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. For more information, please visit www.astrazeneca-us.com and follow us on social media @AstraZeneca.

US-89716 Last Updated 5/24

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FAQ

What are the key findings from the LAURA Phase III trial of TAGRISSO (AZN)?

The LAURA Phase III trial showed a statistically significant and clinically meaningful progression-free survival (PFS) benefit for TAGRISSO in unresectable, Stage III EGFR-mutated NSCLC.

How did IMFINZI (AZN) perform in the ADRIATIC Phase III trial?

The ADRIATIC Phase III trial of IMFINZI demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically meaningful overall survival (OS) and PFS benefit in patients with -stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) who had not progressed following cCRT.

What are the results of the DESTINY-Breast06 trial for ENHERTU (AZN)?

The DESTINY-Breast06 trial showed that ENHERTU significantly improved PFS in patients with HR-positive, HER2-low metastatic breast cancer compared to standard chemotherapy.

What adverse reactions are associated with TAGRISSO (AZN)?

Adverse reactions include interstitial lung disease/pneumonitis, QTc interval prolongation, cardiomyopathy, leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, diarrhea, rash, musculoskeletal pain, neutropenia, nail toxicity, dry skin, stomatitis, and fatigue.

What new therapies are AstraZeneca (AZN) presenting at ASCO 2024?

AstraZeneca will present data on novel therapies like C-CAR031, an autologous CAR-T therapy for liver cancer, and updates from the I-SPY2.2 Phase II trial for datopotamab deruxtecan.

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